What Abe Lincoln’ll get ya

What with Barnes & Noble's recent decision to take the plunge and stock self-published content, it would appear the indie book industry is on the rise, right? There are the proverbial success stories: Fifty Shades of GreyThe Martian. But content aside, it's often even tougher for the self-published to pass muster cover-wise. Peek into one writer's experiment with selecting the often -- questionable? -- graphic design that packages independent titles:

What a $5 Book Cover Looks Like

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Peter Derk's takeaways:

1. If the seller doesn't ask you a good number of questions, forget it. If all they wanna know is your name and the book's title, then they probably won't deliver something of quality. If they ask about the dimensions of the book, font preferences, and if they ask for attached images that show the kinds of things you like, you've found a good seller.

2. I wish I'd identified two sellers I liked and spent my $37 on them, using the extra cash to buy more revisions or other services, rather than spreading the money so thin. I'd be happier with the results, and I'd rather my money had gone to paying people who did a good job.

3. If I'd known I might spend a total of $75 for a finished product that I had the rights to, I would have looked into some other graphic designers to see what $75-$100 would get me. When the price is $5, it's hard to ask other graphic designers to do anything. But when the price is $75, I think there's more room to talk to someone without being insulting.

May Derk's $37 dollars benefit you and yours, too! And speaking of self-publishing, don't forget to join us at Central Library this Saturday for our first annual Indie Author Day celebration -- we'll hear first-hand reports from those in our local St. Louis indie authorship trenches!

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