Toys of Yesterday

Holiday time means more ads for today's toys. Reminisce about the toys from the past with these titles from our digital collections.

Review provided by Hoopla
Toys from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s capture the joy of play and the pure fun of being a kid. But beneath those iconic names are rich veins of nostalgia, memory, and history. These toys-and the stories of the kids, parents, child-rearing experts, inventors, manufacturers, and advertisers they affected-reflect the dynamism of American life. Senior exhibit developer and best-selling author Kate Roberts, along with senior curator Adam Scher, spotlight forty-five memorable toys, placing them in historical context and examining their development and launch, their impact on kids and the larger community, and their reflection of the social and cultural shifts of each decade. The book, developed in conjunction with the national traveling exhibit of the same name, will include firsthand stories shared by adults who revered these toys as kids as well as research gleaned from primary sources and toy experts and collectors.

Review provided by OverDrive
This book tells the story of toys based on TV programs (both from the US and Britain), and how these much-loved objects evolved over the years since the 1930s, through the 'golden age' of children's TV in the 1960s and 1970s, and then onto the 1980s until now, including Pinky & Perky, Magic Roundabout, The Man from UNCLE, Batman, Thunderbirds, The A-Team, Doctor Who, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Review provided by OverDrive
What was your favorite childhood toy? Do you have fond memories of fighting unseen enemies with your G.I. Joe action figures, demolishing fleets of vehicles with your Tonka Toy Trucks, or Karate-chopping imaginary street thugs with your Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? What about carefree summer afternoons counting ticks on your Skip-It, scooting around the neighborhood on your Big Wheel, or soaring down your backyard Slip 'n Slide? Still a little bitter that your parents never let you have a Nerf Super Soaker, or a Barbie Dream House?

Review provided by Hoopla
Have you ever wondered what's inside of your favorite electronic toys? Through simple text written to foster creativity and problem solving, students will the art of innovation. Large, colorful images show students how to complete activities. Additional tools, including a glossary and an index, help students learn new vocabulary and locate information.

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