Remembering the Armistice

Veterans Day, which we celebrate today, was originally known as Armistice Day (& still is in Great Britain and the commonwealth states, as well as in France and Belgium). It was first celebrated to commemorate the end of the (then only, now first) World War. A search of the St. Louis Public Library catalog provides a wealth of resources about veterans, war, and veterans benefits (see for example #Dewey 341, 362, or 940), and while these fall outside the Social Sciences room at Central (as I'm sure you remember, our collection ranges from 000-339), at #Dewey 327 (international relations) we found some fascinating contemporaneous works relative to the Great War:

armistice-pics

  • Germany and the Peace of Europe, by Ferdinand Schevill, published under the auspices of the Germanistic Society of Chicago (1914) which includes a paragraph captioned "The Kaiser Did It" which is in fact a repudiation of the attacks against the German leader.
  • Documents diplomatiques- La Guerre Européene (1914)- including reports on the negotiations preceding Germany's declaration of war against Russia and France
  • America and the World War by Theodore Roosevelt (1915)
  • Vorgeschichte des waffenstillstandes [Background to the Armistice], published by the German National Chancellery (Berlin 1919); the Library also has the English translation (Preliminary History of the Armistice) that was done in 1924 by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace at #Dewey 940.91

Such important history - all available for you to peruse at your Library!

Central Library has also hosted a Veterans Writing Workshop the past 3 years, helping veterans "to remember and heal, to build community and to fully come back home" - so keep your eyes & ears peeled for that.

Many thanks to all who serve or have served our country.

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