Purple Ribbon

The purple ribbon has many meanings. One is to raise awareness for Lupus. Lupus has many different symptoms that cause pain and damage. Download information about its symptoms and treatments with these titles from our digital collections.

Diary of a Mad Lupus Patient by J. H. Johnson, Alana Mousavidin

Review provided by Hoopla
Lupus, also known as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a disease that can affect many different body systems, including the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart, and lungs. Lupus is more common in women than in men. Research continues to be done on finding a cure for this life-threatening illness. This diary records thoughts and feelings for being diagnosed to understanding to accepting the reality of living life with Lupus.

The Autoimmune Solution by Dr. Amy Myers

Review provided by OverDrive
Over 90 percent of the population suffers from inflammation or an autoimmune disorder. Until now, conventional medicine has said there is no cure. Minor irritations like rashes and runny noses are ignored, while chronic and debilitating diseases like Crohn's and rheumatoid arthritis are handled with a cocktail of toxic treatments that fail to address their root cause. But it doesn't have to be this way. In The Autoimmune Solution, Dr. Amy Myers, a renowned leader in functional medicine, offers her medically proven approach to prevent a wide range of inflammatory-related symptoms and diseases, including allergies, obesity, asthma, cardiovascular disease, fibromyalgia, lupus, IBS, chronic headaches, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Lupus by Karin Rhines

Review provided by Hoopla
Between one and two million people in the United States are known to have lupus. But many more people may have it and not know it. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease, which means the body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy cells and invaders like viruses and bacteria. In lupus, the immune system attacks tissues throughout the body. In mild cases symptoms include joint pain and fatigue. The worst cases can end in kidney disease and even death. Lupus is difficult to diagnose and treatment is complicated. Medications can treat symptoms, but there is no cure. People who suffer from this disease need to rely on their families and friends to help them out when symptoms flare up. In 2011, USA TODAY, the Nation's No. 1 Newspaper, reported that for the first time in fifty-six years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug to treat lupus. In this book you will follow the stories of people living with lupus and learn about causes and symptoms of this debilitating disease. You'll find out about available treatments and ongoing research into new medications and therapies. You'll also receive guidance on how to cope with lupus or help a loved one manage symptoms and find help.

The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook by Mickey Trescott, Angie Alt

Review provided by Hoopla
The way autoimmune disease is viewed and treated is undergoing a major change as an estimated 50 million Americans (and growing) suffer from these conditions. For many patients, the key to true wellness is in holistic treatment, although they might not know how to begin their journey to total recovery. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook, from Mickey Trescott and Angie Alt of Autoimmune-Paleo.com, is a comprehensive guide to living healthfully with autoimmune disease. While conventional medicine is limited to medication or even surgical fixes, Trescott and Alt introduce a complementary solution that focuses on seven key steps to recovery: inform, collaborate, nourish, rest, breathe, move, and connect. Each step demystifies the process to reclaim total mind and body health. With five autoimmune conditions between them, Trescott and Alt have achieved astounding results using the premises laid out in the book. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook goes well beyond nutrition and provides the missing link so that you can get back to living a vibrant, healthy life.

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