Pest-Proof Your Garden Naturally

Some plants naturally repel certain pests. These titles from our digital collections can help you identify which plants to use as a natural pest repellent, so you can control pesky bugs and the damage they can inflict on your garden.

Review provided by OverDrive
With growing consumer awareness about the dangers of garden chemicals, turn to The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control as the most reliable and comprehensive guide on the garden shelf. Rodale has been the category leader in organic methods for decades, and this thoroughly updated edition features the latest science-based recommendations for battling garden problems. With all-new photos of common and recently introduced pests and plant diseases, you can quickly identify whether you've discovered garden friend or foe and what action, if any, you should take.

Review provided by Hoopla
If we garden, we have seen damage done by insects. Whether it is damage done to fruits and vegetables or to our prized ornamentals, it is frustrating to say the least. Often, seeing the damage provokes our indignation and we declare war on all the insects in the garden without considering the repercussions that our actions might bring. Instead of pulling a chemical pesticide off the shelf, an alternative method of insect pest control would be to attract the natural predators to our gardens. A simple and well-known example would be using lady bugs to keep the aphids on our roses under control. Beneficial insects can do a much better job of controlling the pest population than we can, and it is possible and very rewarding to form a relationship with the beneficial insects. This manual explains who the beneficial insects are, how to design and create an insectary for the home garden and how to manage insect pests by attracting and sustaining beneficial insects.

Review provided by Hoopla
With Information on Disease Control, Insects and Methods of Plant Spraying
This book comprises a comprehensive guide to controlling pests and diseases common to cultivated crops, with handy information on disease control, insects, and methods of plant spraying. Complete with simple instructions and a wealth of interesting and practicable information, this text constitutes a great resource for farmers and kitchen gardeners. Although old, much of the information contained herein is timeless, and will still be of considerable use to modern readers.

Review provided by OverDrive
Insects are indeed valuable garden companions, especially species known for eating the assassin bugs, damsel bugs, stink bugs, and other predatory carnivores that dine on your garden. Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden is a book about bugs and plants, and how to create a garden that benefits from both. In addition to information on companion planting and commercial options for purchasing bugs, there are 19 detailed bug profiles and 39 plant profiles. These profiles include a description, a photograph for identification, an explanation of what they can do to support pest control. Design plans show how to create a border specifically for the natural, sustainable inclusion of beneficial bugs in your garden.

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