Patents and Trademarks of World War I

Last month marks the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I on April 6, 1917, and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has taken a look back into its archives of patents and trademarks from that era.

Certain items developed for troops in WWI went on to become part of everyday life for Americans. One example is the “hookless fastener” or zipper, patented by Gideon Sundback in 1916, which the U.S. military incorporated into uniforms and boots, and also caught on quickly in civilian clothing.

Zipper patent drawings

During the WWI years, many products were also trademarked that are still in use today. For example, Dixie®, trademarked in 1917, developed a paper cup to prevent the spread of germs, and the company still produces an array of paper products today.

St. Louis Public Library also commemorates the centenary of America's official involvement in the First World War, with the new exhibit, "World War I: My Fellow Soldiers" on display until August 19 at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street.

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