Mammograms: What to Expect

A mammogram is an X-ray image of your breasts used for the detection of breast cancer. They play a key role in early breast cancer detection. Knowing what to expect while getting a mammogram can make the process easier.

A mammogram takes about 20 minutes. You will need to undress above the waist. You might find it easier to wear a skirt or pants. A technologist will position your breasts on the machine and compress them between two firm surfaces to spread out the breast tissue. The actual breast compression only lasts a few seconds.

The X-ray images are then examined by a doctor who looks for lumps, tumors, and abnormalities that could be a sign of cancer.

There is no ideal age to start screening for breast cancer. Talk with your doctor about your risk factors and the benefits of mammogram screening. Together, you can decide what screening mammography schedule is best for you.

Explore these eBooks from our digital collections to learn more about mammograms.

Review provided by Hoopla
In 2009, an influential panel of medical experts ignited a controversy when they recommended that most women should not begin routine mammograms to screen for breast cancer until the age of fifty, reversing guidelines they had issued just seven years before when they recommended forty as the optimal age to start getting mammograms. While some praised the new recommendation as sensible given the smaller benefit women under fifty derive from mammography, many women's groups, health care advocates, and individual women saw the guidelines as privileging financial considerations over women's health and a setback to decades-long efforts to reduce the mortality rate of breast cancer.

Review provided by OverDrive
Most women don't want to hear about breast cancer unless they have it and need to make some decisions, but these days news about breast cancer—the number one killer of women ages twenty to fifty-nine—is everywhere. Hope for a cure abounds. Celebrities have come forward to share their experiences and raise awareness. Chances are you know someone who has had it.

Review provided by Hoopla
Most women don't want to hear about breast cancer unless they have it and need to make some decisions, but these days news about breast cancer—the number one killer of women ages twenty to fifty-nine—is everywhere. Hope for a cure abounds. Celebrities have come forward to share their experiences and raise awareness. Chances are you know someone who has had it.

Review provided by Hoopla
My book is about being diagnosed with breast cancer and all the wonderful games I got to play. It starts out with the mammogram and further testing and continues with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. I was fortunate to have a less-invasive type of cancer and didn't need the kind of chemotherapy that makes your hair fall out, but I still had problems. I am a nurse, but I was unaware of most of the processes involved in the treatment of breast cancer. I did learn a lot about diagnosis, testing, and prognosis of different types of breast cancer.

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