Listen About World War 1

On June 24th at Central Library, historian and author Mitchell Yockelson discusses his book, “Forty-Seven Days: How Pershing’s Warriors Came to Age to Defeat the German Army in WWI,” detailing how General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing’s exemplary leadership led to the unlikeliest of victories. Listen to his and other World War 1 titles with these audiobooks from our digital collection.

Forty-Seven Days by Mitchell Yockelson

Review provided by Hoopla

The Battle of the Meuse-Argonne stands as the deadliest clash in American history: More than a million untested American soldiers went up against a better-trained and more experienced German army, costing more than twenty-six thousand deaths and leaving nearly a hundred thousand wounded. Yet in forty-seven days of intense combat, those Americans pushed back the enemy and forced the Germans to surrender, bringing the First World War to an end - a feat the British and the French had not achieved after more than three years of fighting. In Forty-Seven Days, historian Mitchell Yockelson tells how General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing's exemplary leadership led to the unlikeliest of victories. Appointed commander of the American Expeditionary Forces by President Wilson, Pershing personally took command of the U.S. First Army until supplies ran low and the fighting ground to a stalemate. Refusing to admit defeat, Pershing stepped aside and placed gutsy Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett in charge. While Pershing retained command, Liggett reorganized his new unit, resting and resupplying his men, while instilling a confidence in the doughboys that drove them out of the trenches and across no-man's-land.

The First World War by Hew Strachan

Review provided by Hoopla

A century has passed since the outbreak of World War I, yet as military historian Hew Strachan argues in this brilliant and authoritative new book, the legacy of the "war to end all wars" is with us still. The First World War was a truly global conflict from the start, with many of the most decisive battles fought in or directly affecting the Balkans, Africa, and the Ottoman Empire. Even more than World War II, the First World War continues to shape the politics and international relations of our world. Strachan has done a masterful job of reexamining the causes, the major campaigns, and the consequences of the First World War, compressing a lifetime of knowledge into a single definitive volume tailored for the general reader. Written in crisp, compelling prose, The First World War re-creates this world-altering conflict both on and off the battlefield-the clash of ideologies between the colonial powers at the center of the war, the social and economic unrest that swept Europe both before and after, the military strategies employed with stunning success and tragic failure in the various theaters of war, the terms of peace and why it didn't last.

World War I by Ralph Raico

Review provided by Hoopla

By the turn of the twentieth century, the United States had evolved from a British colony into an international power. As a result of the Spanish-American War, America had acquired colonies in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, as well as a taste for international politics. Then the First World War erupted. As it dragged on, Americans fiercely debated US involvement; the nation had a deep tradition of avoiding foreign wars. But while the Spanish-American War had challenged this tradition, the First World War would shatter it. President Woodrow Wilson called World War I “a war to make the world safe for democracy.” But the conflict brought neither safety nor democracy—instead, governments restricted personal and economic liberties to better pursue the war. In Russia, the Bolsheviks would translate an antiwar groundswell into a communist revolution and revolutionaries around the world would look to them as a model. Even the Treaty of Versailles, which formally ended the war between Germany and the Allies, brought no security. Of the treaty and its harsh terms, a French representative declared, “This is not peace. It is an armistice for twenty years.” The United States at War series is a collection of presentations that review the political, economic, and social tensions that have erupted in military conflict and examine how the conflict resolved, or failed to resolve, those tensions.

NPR American Chronicles: World War I by Various Authors

Review provided by Hoopla

Famously referred to by US president Woodrow Wilson as the war to end all wars, the first world war eclipsed all previous wars with its scale of destruction. With over twenty-seven nations involved, the battle-field horrors and political outcomes of the first truly global military conflict had repercussions that are still felt today. NPR presents a vivid portrait of what most experts consider the first modern war, including profiles of America's flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker, unlikely savior of war-torn Belgium Herbert Hoover, and the last surviving doughboy Frank Buckles.

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