Honoring Those Who Have Served

Veterans Day honors military veterans  who have served in the United States Armed Forces. It marks the anniversary of the end of World War I that formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. These titles from our digital collections explain the courage, sacrifice and dedication it takes to be a soldier.

For Love of Country by Howard Schultz

A celebration of the extraordinary courage, dedication, and sacrifice of this generation of American veterans on the battlefield and their equally valuable contributions on the home front. Because so few of us now serve in the military, our men and women in uniform have become strangers to us. We stand up at athletic events to honor them, but we hardly know their true measure. Here, Starbucks CEO and longtime veterans' advocate Howard Schultz and National Book Award finalist Rajiv Chandrasekaran of The Washington Post offer an enlightening, inspiring corrective.

American Soldiers by Peter S. Kindsvatter

Some warriors are drawn to the thrill of combat and find it the defining moment of their lives. Others fall victim to fear, exhaustion, impaired reasoning, and despair. This was certainly true for twentieth-century American ground troops. Whether embracing or being demoralized by war, these men risked their lives for causes larger than themselves with no promise of safe return. Focusing on both soldiers and marines, Peter S. Kindsvatter draws on histories and memoirs, oral histories, psychological and sociological studies, and even fiction to show that their experiences remain fundamentally the same regardless of the enemy, terrain, training, or weaponry. Kindsvatter gets inside the minds of American soldiers to reveal what motivated them to serve and how they were turned into soldiers. He re-creates the physical and emotional aspects of war to tell how fighting men dealt with danger and hardship, and he explores the roles of comradeship, leadership, and the sustaining beliefs in cause and country. He also illuminates soldiers' attitudes toward the enemy, toward the rear echelon, and toward the home front.

Waking Up from War by Joseph Bobrow

This book argues that the elements that contribute to healing war trauma—including safety, connection, community, dialogue, mutual respect, diversity, and compassion—can help build a stronger nation. But this message comes with a warning and a challenge not just for caregivers, veterans service organizations, governmental departments, Congress, and the White House, but for all Americans. War creates incalculable suffering—not only among those on the front lines, but also among those left behind. For every soldier killed or injured on the battlefield, countless others are affected—particularly relatives and friends—often in isolation and silence.

We Went to War by Michael Grigsby

In 1970, Michael Grigsby made the award winning I WAS A SOLDIER, which focused on David, Dennis and Lamar, recently returned veterans from Vietnam. WE WENT TO WAR picks up their gripping emotional story over 40 years later.

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