Hats Off to Reading!

Baseball caps, top hats, sun hats, party hats… there are so many kinds of hats! These stories celebrate hats and the people who love them!

Hat by Paul Hoppe
A boy and his mom happen upon a lone hat in the middle of the park. It’s bright red, and fits Henry just right. Turns out, Hat has a ton of important uses! It shields the sun. It doubles as a sled or a boat. It even fights crocodiles in Africa. . . . But what about Hat’s owner? Maybe he or she needs Hat even more than Henry does. Henry’s imagination may have run away from him, but in the end, his heart knows the right thing to do. An arty picture book about a boy and his imagination, Hat inspires readers to revel in the power of creativity.

I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen
The bear’s hat is gone, and he wants it back. Patiently and politely, he asks the animals he comes across, one by one, whether they have seen it. Each animal says no, some more elaborately than others. But just as the bear begins to despond, a deer comes by and asks a simple question that sparks the bear’s memory and renews his search with a vengeance. Told completely in dialogue, this delicious take on the classic repetitive tale plays out in sly illustrations laced with visual humor– and winks at the reader with a wry irreverence that will have kids of all ages thrilled to be in on the joke.

Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
This story about a peddler and a band of mischievous monkeys is filled with warmth, humor, and simplicity and teaches children about problem and resolution. Children will delight in following the peddler’s efforts to outwit the monkeys and will ask to read it again and again. Caps for Sale is an excellent easy-to-read book that includes repetition, patterns, and colors, perfect for early readers.

Do You Have A Hat? by Eileen Spinelli
What do Spanish painter Francisco de Goya, Russian-American composer Igor Stravinsky, South American entertainer Carmen Miranda, African-American cowboy Nat Love, and President Abraham Lincoln have in common? HATS! Unique, distinctive, wonderful hats! And this bright and cheerful picture book from best-selling author Eileen Spinelli and colorful newcomer Geraldo Valério will have you thinking twice before going outside without yours!

I Had A Favorite Hat by Boni Ashburn
The narrator of this charming picture book loves her summer hat, but as the seasons change, her hat isn’t always appropriate for every occasion. She must use her crafting skills to turn the hat into a work of art, perfect for every season and holiday. Featuring the same characters from the first book, I Had a Favorite Dress, along with the hip, eye-catching art style that won it so many fans, this book is perfect for young crafters and their stylish parents.

Brimsby's Hats by Andrew Prahin
A lonely hat maker uses quirky creativity to make friends in this delightful picture book that will charm readers young and old. Brimsby is a happy hat maker–until his best friend goes off to find adventure at sea. Now Brimsby is a lonely hat maker, unsure of what to do. But since making hats is what he does best, perhaps his talents can help him find some friends… Filled with whimsy and wonder, Brimsby’s Hats is a celebration of creativity and friendship.

Hooray for Hat! by Brian Won
Elephant wakes up grumpy–until ding, dong! What’s in the surprise box at the front door? A hat! HOORAY FOR HAT! Elephant marches off to show Zebra, but Zebra is having a grumpy day, too–until Elephant shares his new hat and cheers up his friend. Off they march to show Turtle! The parade continues as every animal brightens the day of a grumpy friend. An irresistible celebration of friendship, sharing, and fabulous hats.

After reading these books, it’s time to make your own hat! Young children will enjoy creating and decorating this simple hat from East Coast Mommy, while older kiddos will delight in a more challenging project from Krokatak.

hatcrafts

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