Groucho, Chico, and Harpo

In the 1890's, Groucho, Chico and Harpo (Julius, Leonard and Adolph Marx) were born to Jewish immigrant parents in Manhattan's Yorkville section. Groucho, was a master of one-liners, Harpo wore a curly wig and never talked, and Chico used a fake Italian accent. Read more about the brothers with these titles from our digital collections.

Review provided by Hoopla
Groucho Marx was a comic genius who starred on stage and in film, radio, and television. But he was also a gifted writer the author of a play, two screenplays, seven books, and over 100 articles and essays. This newly expanded collection presents the best of Groucho's short comic pieces, written over a period of more than fifty years between 1919 and 1973 for the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Saturday Evening Post, Variety, the Hollywood Reporter, and other newspapers and magazines. Here is the one and only Groucho on his family, his days in vaudeville, his career, World War II, taxes, and other topics from his love of a good cigar to his chronic insomnia, from "Why Harpo Doesn't Talk" to "The Truth about Captain Spalding." The familiar irreverence, wordplay, and a dash of self-deprecation bring Groucho's wisecracking voice to life in these pages, firmly establishing him as one of the world's great humorists. Groucho Marx and Other Short Stories and Tall Tales (a title of Groucho's own choosing) is essential reading for Marx Brothers fans, and a hilarious and nostalgic trip through the twentieth century.

Review provided by Hoopla
First published in 1961, this is the autobiography of Harpo Marx, the silent comedian of The Marx Brothers fame. Writing of his life before, during, and after becoming famous by incorporating lovely and humorous stories and anecdotes, Harp Marx tells of growing up in a rough neighborhood and being poor, being bullied and dropping out of school, teaching himself to read, write, tell time, and to play the piano and harp. He speaks of his close relationships with his family members, particularly his mother and brother Leonard (Chico), who would become his partner-in-crime on screen, and the profound effect that the death of his parents Sam and Minnie had on him. Filled with insider tales of his antics on and off stage, and the hard graft he and his brothers put into reaching their level of success, the reader becomes privy to a rare glimpse into Marx' thoughts on everything and everyone he had the privilege of working with. The book reveals the friendships he forged and the blows he was dealt in show-business, and of his marriage to his wife, actress Susan Fleming, with whom he adopted four children and built a ranch on which they lived happily ever after, along with numerous animals. A thoroughly enjoyable read.

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The "Me" in the title is a comparatively unknown Marx named Julius (1895-1977), who, under the nom de plume of Groucho, enjoyed a sensational career on Broadway and in Hollywood with such comedy classics as Animal Crackers, Monkey Business, Horse Feathers, Duck Soup, A Night at the Opera, and A Day at the Races. His solo career included work as a film actor, television game show emcee, and author of The Groucho Letters, Memoirs of a Mangy Lover, and his classic autobiography, Groucho and Me. With impeccable timing, outrageous humor, irreverent wit, and a superb sense of the ridiculous, Groucho tells the saga of the Marx Brothers: the poverty of their childhood in New York's Upper East Side; the crooked world of small-time vaudeville (where they learned to carry blackjacks); how a pretzel magnate and the graceless dancer of his dreams led to the Marx Brothers' first Broadway hit, I'll Say She Is!, how the stock market crash in 1929 proved a godsend for Groucho (even though he lost nearly a quarter of a million dollars); the adventures of the Marx Brothers in Hollywood, the making of their hilarious films, and Groucho's triumphant television series, You Bet Your Life!. Here is the life and lunatic times of the great eccentric genius, Groucho, a.k.a. Julius Henry Marx.

Review provided by Hoopla
Bill Marx is the last living person to have worked professionally with the three Marx Brothers: his uncles, Chico and Groucho, and his father, Harpo Marx. Because Chico and Groucho had children that had written about them, Bill Marx wanted to complete the Marx Brothers' literary trifecta by authoring a book about the personal and professional relationships that he had with his father. Son of Harpo Speaks!, in addition to offering a unique perspective of a very special man and revealing many stories never before in print, is also a book about a "too-Hollywood-to-believe" life-altering quirk of fate that ultimately brought him together with his parents. The background for this remarkable revelation unfolded unassumingly over a glass of wine and some conversation in the famous 1960s nightclub, Dino's Lodge, on Hollywood's Sunset Strip. It would subsequently lead the author to explore the complex life task of dealing with his emotional scars of rejection and the secure feelings of acceptance, the latter due to his overwhelmingly good fortune of having been adopted by two loving parents. Plenty of "show-biz" and "sizzle" are also sprinkled throughout to make for a very enjoyable read.

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