Get Off Your Horse and Drink Your Milk

In the age of never-ending technology, it can be a relief to step back into a time of steam engines, horses, duels, saloons, and the wide open range. After all, Westworld a recently re-made movie turned TV show, gave us a glimpse of the wealthy buying a taste of the Wild West. Do you ever imagine yourself chasing down a locomotive on your wild stallion with guns a blazing? Or pushing open the saloon doors and loudly stating your name and demanding a nice cold beer? If that sounds like your imaginings then come visit us in The Center for the Reader at Central Library branch. We have a great collection of western novels. There’s our well-known Louis L’Amour with classic western tales such as; The Trail to Crazy Man, Treasure Mountain, and The Empty Land. Or give The Western Double by Max Brand a shot. A.B Guthrie was not only a great author of westerns his books were adapted into movies. His novels The Way West and The Big Sky are considered classic novels and classic western films. Did you know, The Western Writers of America (WWA) had created lists of the Best Western novels, once in 1985 and again in 1995.  Each time had similar results in several areas. However, around the year 2000 the WWA felt it was time to reprise the list of best western novels. Want to check out the list? Go to http://westernwriters.org/  They brought together a panel of fifty-five individuals from twenty-two states and one Canadian province, provided them with their votes for the best work and authors of the 20th century. As we began with a classic John Wayne quote let us end it with another one, “Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyways.” So get on your horse, put on your hat, and ride like the wind to The St. Louis Public Library Center for the Reader! (Did you read it in a John Wayne voice?)





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