Folk Remedies for Today’s Medicine

Many discoveries in medicine have been made by people who are not medically trained. Medical folk remedies are found in every culture. They have been passed down through families and around the world through travel, migration and exploration. Download these titles to see some of the remedies that have been adopted for use by today’s modern medicine.

The Country Almanac Of Home Remedies by Brigitte Mars, Chrystle Fiedler

Review provided by Hoopla
The Country Almanac of Home Remedies presents hundreds of natural and time-tested methods for treating hundreds of common ailments including burns, insect bites, skin rashes, PMS, and upset stomach. The book includes thrifty and easy remedies that can be made from items commonly found in the pantry, refrigerator, and garden. Readers get DIY solutions they can use for quick relief of common ailments through natural alternatives--without a trip to the pharmacy. For example, using a paste of crushed up aspirin and water to calm the inflammation of sunburn. Each remedy references the latest studies and medical advice to tell readers why it works-i.e. valerian root is a mild version of the prescription drug valium thus making a cup of valerian tea the perfect remedy for stress, PMS, and other nervous conditions.

The Herbal Handbook for Home and Health by Pip Waller

Review provided by OverDrive
Kitchen pharmacy meets green cleaning and natural beauty in this comprehensive handbook of 501 recipes that harness the power of plants to enhance wellness and toxin-free living. Expert herbalist Pip Waller provides a wealth of information about growing, collecting, preserving, and preparing herbs for a variety of purposes--from cleaning products, to food and drink, medicines, beauty products, and more. Attractive and easy to use, The Herbal Handbook for Home and Health includes growing tips and pro?les of herbs, guidelines for setting up an herbalist's kitchen, and techniques to make everything from tinctures to tonics. A valuable resource for anyone affected by allergies or sensitivities, this compendium is handsomely produced with two-color printing throughout and more than three hundred striking illustrations.

The Doctors Book of Food Remedies by Selene Yeager, The Editors of Prevention Magazine

Review provided by Hoopla
In recent years, scientists have discovered thousands of substances in foods that go way beyond vitamins and minerals for pure healing power. The Doctors Book of Food Remedies shows how to use Mother Nature's "healing foods" to lose weight, prevent cancer, reverse heart disease, cleanse arteries, unleash an explosion of new energy, lower cholesterol, look and feel years younger, and much, much more. Here readers will discover how to: Cut the risk of heart attack in half by snacking on nuts Protect against colon cancer by eating grapefruit Cool off hot flashes with flaxseed Heal a wound with honey Fight diabetes with milk--and wine Reduce cholesterol with cinnamon Written in collaboration with the editors of Prevention magazine, one of America's most trusted sources for health information, the book covers 60 different ailments and 97 different healing foods, and offers 100 delicious, nutrient-rich recipes. Newly researched, every entry provides current information and the latest clinical studies from real doctors and nutritionists working in some of the best medical institutions in the United States.

Healing Spices by Instructables.com

Review provided by OverDrive
Spices not only add a flavorful kick to meals, they also have some amazing benefits to improve certain ailments and improve overall health. Rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, spices and herbs like turmeric, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, garlic, cloves, coriander, and sage can fight inflammation, protect against chronic conditions, and can even help with losing weight.
Featuring dozens of recipes for meals and beauty remedies, Healing Spices is a great tool for anyone looking to add more flavor to their diet and cut out unhealthy seasonings like salt, sugar, and fatty oils.

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