Becoming a U.S. Citizen

Having the right to vote; traveling on a U.S. passport; applying for a U.S. Government job--American citizens are proud of these rights. Those not born in the United States can apply for naturalization to become a U.S. citizen. The process will include filling out forms, taking a test, being fingerprinted, being proficient in English, and going through an interview. These titles from our digital collections can help you  go through the naturalization process to become a citizen.

Your U. S. Citizenship Guide by Anita Biase

Review provided by Hoopla

Citizenship in the United States is the legal status given to a legal member of the country. It involves rights, duties, and privileges and is one of the most coveted gifts that the U. S. government can bestow on a person and the most important immigration benefit that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can grant. The road map outlined in this new book will help foreign nationals apply for citizenship and will lead those seeking citizenship to the fastest and easiest way to do so. With the guidance of this new and up-to-date book you will learn about the application instructions, procedures, required forms, eligibility information, application requirements, waivers, exceptions, special cases, the naturalization process, application forms, immigration forms, certificates of naturalization, and dual citizenship. In addition, you will become knowledgeable about the principles of the U. S. Constitution, favorable disposition toward the United States, the benefits of being a citizen, and the responsibilities of being a citizen. You will be provided with information on the interview, sample test questions and answers, a list of all USCIS offices nationwide, a list of U. S. embassies and consulates, and everything else you will need to know to become a United States citizen in no time at all, including how to pass the citizenship test.

Citizenship Papers by Wendell Berry

Review provided by Hoopla

Citizenship papers, n 1. Materials prepared for presentation to authorities when making an application for citizenship. 2. Documents presented as proof of citizenship. There are those in America today who seem to feel we must audition for our citizenship, with "Patriot" offered as the badge for those found narrowly worthy. Let this book stand as Wendell Berry's application, for he is one of those faithful, devoted critics envisioned by the Founding Fathers to be the life's blood and very future of the nation they imagined. Adams, Jefferson and Madison would have found great clarity in his prose and great hope in his vision. And today's readers will be moved and encouraged by his anger and his refusal to surrender in the face of desperate odds. Books get written for all sorts of reasons, and this book was written out of necessity. Citizenship Papers collects nineteen new essays, from celebrations of exemplary lives to critiques of American life, including "A Citizen's Response [to the new National Security Strategy]"-a ringing call of caution to a nation standing on the brink of global catastrophe.

The Meaning of Citizenship by Richard Marback, Marc W. Kruman

Review provided by Hoopla

The essays in this volume are drawn from the tenth anniversary conference of the Center for the Study of Citizenship at Wayne State University, whose theme, "The Meaning of Citizenship," provided an opportunity to reflect on a decade of study in the field. In an academic area where definitions are dynamic and multidisciplinary, editors Richard Marback and Marc W. Kruman have assembled fifteen contributors to show some of the rich nuances of membership in a political community. The Meaning of Citizenship addresses four dimensions of citizenship: the differentiation of citizenship in theory and practice, the proper horizon of citizenship, the character of civic bonds, and the resolution of conflicting civic and personal obligations. Contributors answer these questions from varying disciplinary perspectives, including ethnography, history, and literary analysis. Essays also consider the relevance of these questions in a number of specific regions, from Africa to the Caribbean, Middle East, Europe, and the United States. By identifying the meaning of citizenship in terms of geographic specificity and historical trajectory, the essays in this volume argue as a whole for a cross-disciplinary approach to the issues of inclusion and exclusion that are generated through any assertion of what citizenship means. The four primary concerns taken up by the contributors to this volume are as timely as they are timeless. Scholars of history, political science, sociology, and citizenship studies will appreciate this conversation about the full meaning of citizenship.

How To Become A U.S. Citizen by Marci Daniels

Review provided by Hoopla

How To Become A U.S. Citizen is your definitive pocket guide to becoming a permanent legal resident of the United States. Informative and concise, this book gathers and condenses crucial information on citizenship and presents it in an easy-to-read format.

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