Basketry

Dating back to pre-historic times, basket making is one of the oldest handicrafts. Basketry is a complex art that bonds modern Native Americans to their ancestors and traditional way of life. Discover basket designs that can be simple or complex with these titles from our digital collections.

Review provided by Hoopa
Provides detailed advice on basket design, materials, techniques, and care, with step-by-step instructions for a wealth of basketry projects: shopping basket, wastepaper basket, picnic basket, all-purpose plate, wine cradle, fruit bowl, and more. Range of weaving materials includes willow, cane, rush, raffia, straw, grasses, and others. 294 illustrations.

Review provided by Hoopla
The methods of Indian basket weaving explained in this excellent manual are the very ones employed by native practitioners of the craft. Members of the Navajo School of Indian Basketry have set down their secrets in clear and simple language, enabling even the beginner to create work that can rival theirs in grace, design, and usefulness. The text begins with basic techniques: choice of materials, preparation of the reed, splicing, the introduction of color, principles and methods of design, shaping the basket and finishing. A great variety of baskets and weaves from many cultures are described in subsequent chapters, such as Lazy Squaw, Mariposa, Toas, Samoan, Klikitat, and Shilo, each accompanied by specific instructions.

Review provided by Hoopla
Full text, plus more than 700 precise drawings of basketry, sculpture, painting, pottery, sand paintings, metal, much more. 4 plates in color. Text gives lore and tradition behind the designs plus Indians' own songs and stories.

Review provided by Hoopla
A tradition that dates back almost ten thousand years, basketry is an integral aspect of Cherokee culture. In the mountains of Western North Carolina, stunning baskets are still made from rivercane, white oak and honeysuckle and dyed with roots and bark. Cherokee Basketry describes the craft's forms, functions and methods and records the tradition's celebrated makers. This complex art, passed down from mothers to daughters, is a thread that bonds modern Native Americans to ancestors and traditional ways of life. Anna Fariello, associate professor at Western Carolina University, reveals that baskets hold much more than food and clothing. Woven with the stories of those who produce and use them, these masterpieces remain a powerful testament to creativity and imagination.

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