Are you a gamer?

Are you focused on shooting mythological creatures, moving up to the next level, or gaining a power shield, the true gamer can spend hours in this virtual world. If you can sit for hours at a computer hitting the keys or mouse at lightening speed, odds are that you are a gamer.

Getting Gamers by Jamie Madigan

Review provided by OverDrive

Video games are big business. They can be addicting. They are available almost anywhere you go and are appealing to people of all ages. They can eat up our time, cost us money, even kill our relationships. But it's not all bad! This book will show that rather than being a waste of time, video games can help us develop skills, make friends, succeed at work, form good habits, and be happy. Taking the time to learn what's happening in our heads as we play and shop allows us to approach games and gaming communities on our own terms and get more out of them.

Thinking about Video Games by David S. Heineman

Review provided by Hoopla

The growth in popularity and complexity of video games has spurred new interest in how games are developed and in the research and technology behind them. David Heineman brings together some of the most iconic, influential, and interesting voices from across the gaming industry and asks them to weigh in on the past, present, and future of video games. Among them are legendary game designers Nolan Bushnell (Pong) and Eugene Jarvis (Defender), who talk about their history of innovations from the earliest days of the video game industry through to the present; contemporary trailblazers Kellee Santiago (Journey) and Casey Hudson (Mass Effect), who discuss contemporary relationships between those who create games and those who play them; and scholars Ian Bogost (How to Do Things With Videogames) and Edward Castronova (Exodus to the Virtual World), who discuss how to research and write about games in ways that engage a range of audiences. These experts and others offer fascinating perspectives on video games, game studies, gaming culture, and the game industry more broadly.

Death by Video Game by Simon Parkin

Review provided by OverDrive

On January 31, 2012, a twenty-three-year-old student was found dead at his keyboard in an internet café while the video game he had been playing for three days straight continued to flash on the screen in front of him.Trying to reconstruct what had happened that night, investigative journalist Simon Parkin would discover that there have been numerous other incidents of "death by video game."

Online Gamer

Review provided by Hoopla

Aaron, an avid online video gamer, tries his best to fit in with the real world. In his attempt to lead a normal life, he finds himself encountering life problems with a most unforgiving approach.

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