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Exergaming: Fun Way to Work Out

If youíre looking for an exercise program but donít want to pay a costly gym membership, there may be an answer in your entertainment center: exergaming with your video gaming system.  Whether your household has an Xbox 360. a Wii, or PlayStation 3, there is a way to use your gaming system to get fit by using platform add-ons.

Wii fitness for dummies
by Christina T. Loguidice, Bill Loguidice.
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley Publishing, c2010.
Have fun while getting fit!Here's how to get the most from your Wii Fitness systemIt's a perfect fit - Wii gaming fun designed to improve your overall health and fitness! The advice of these two personal trainers makes it even better. You'll learn to use Wii Fit Plus, EA Sports Active: Personal Trainer, and Jillian Michaels Fitness Ultimatum 2010. Find out how to create your own individualized workout and watch yourself improve!What's all this stuff? - set up Wii Fit Plus, EA Sports Active: Personal Trainer, and Jillian Michaels Fitness Ultimatum 2010The right way - learn the safest and most effective way to perform dozens of exercisesSpice it up - explore different types of exercises to keep your routine freshTake a deep breath - improve health benefits by learning optimal breathing techniquesHave a heart - strengthen your heart and lungs while enjoying the challenge of sportsA delicate balance - identify routines that improve your balance while strengthening different muscle groupsAll season sports - experience volleyball, baseball, boxing, tennis, inline skating, and basketball right in your living roomKeep it interesting - vary your workout by moving among the featured gamesOpen the book and find:Ways to vary your routineHow to set up your Fitness ProfileTips for staying motivatedThe power of yoga and strength trainingWhat to consider when setting fitness goalsWarm-up and cool-down routinesHow to build your own workoutTen cool Wii Fitness accessoriesTen other Wii Fitness games to expand your virtual gym
     
The gadget geek's guide to your Xbox 360
by Jonathan S. Harbour.
Boston, MA : Thomson Course Technology, c2006.
Microsoft's Xbox 360 takes high-definition gaming and entertainment to the next level! "The Gadget Geek's Guide to Your Xbox 360" shows readers how to harness the power of the Xbox 360 digital entertainment console. Starting with the basic features, games, and capabilities of the Xbox 360, the book goes on to explore how to add to your hardware, how to hack into popular games, and how to engage in live gaming and connect with the Xbox community. The book features helpful tips, expert advice, interviews with gamers, and more and the author is an experience Xbox enthusiast who brings insight and expert advice to the book.
     

Exergaming has been around for many years.  Dance Dance Revolution was originally an arcade game until it was released as a home game by PlayStation in 1998.  This was the first successful exercise game using an electronic pad to track foot movements.

The Nintendo Wii was released in 2006.  This gaming system uses remotes to track arm movement.  With the advent of Wii Fit a balance board was added to track leg movements.

In 2010, Microsoft started selling the Xbox Kinect.  This add-on to the Xbox 360 gaming system tracks full body movements through a camera.  No controller is necessary; the gamer becomes the controller. The gamer must have a fixed amount of space to use the Kinect properly. 

Sport games are another way to get you and your family moving. Imagine a bowling alley, putt putt golf course or even carnival games in the middle of your family room.

Also in 2010, PlayStation 3 released a motion sensing game controller called the PlayStation Move.  Like the Wii, the PlayStation uses a handheld controller/sensor for the gamer.  The sensor works in conjunction with the PlayStation Eye camera.

Games such as Fit N Six and Winter Sports for the Wii and Dance Central and Body and Brain for Xbox can put the gamer through rigorous workouts.

Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff