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Becoming a U.S. citizen

Do you have what it takes to become a citizen? Sample some questions.

U.S citizen test

Data from the 2000 Census recorded Missouri's naturalized population at 61,786 residents. That was a naturalization rate of 40.9 percent, slightly higher than the national average rate of 40.1 percent.

Having the right to vote; traveling on a U.S. passport; applying for a U.S. Government job--American citizens are proud of these rights. Those not born in the United States can go through the naturalization process to become a citizen.

Pass the U.S. citizenship exam.
 
New York : LearningExpress, c2011.
This revision includes everything a candidate needs to know to become a US Citizen including: How to apply, How to prepare for and pass the exam, and how to have a successful interview. It features official USCIS questions and answers for lots of practice. Also includes a list of all of the English vocabulary words needed. Finally, users can access a FREE online customized diagnostic report to identify their strengths and areas for improvement.
     
Sprawl, justice, and citizenship : the civic costs of the American way of life
Thad Williamson.
New York, N.Y. : Oxford University Press, 2010.
Must the strip mall and the eight-lane highway define 21st century American life? That is a central question posed by critics of suburban and exurban living in America. Yet despite the ubiquity of the critique, it never sticks--Americans by the scores of millions have willingly moved into sprawling developments over the past few decades. Americans find many of the more substantial criticisms of sprawl easy to ignore because they often come across as snobbish in tone. Yet as ThadWilliamson explains, sprawl does create real, measurable social problems. Williamson's work is unique in two important ways. First, while he highlights the deleterious effects of sprawl on civic life in America, he is also evenhanded. He does not dismiss the pastoral, homeowning ideal that is at theroot of sprawl, and is sympathetic to the vast numbers of Americans who very clearly prefer it. Secondly, his critique is neither aesthetic nor moralistic in tone, but based on social science. Utilizing a landmark 30,000-person survey, he shows that sprawl fosters civic disengagement, diminishes social trust, accentuates inequality, and negatively impacts the environment. Sprawl, Justice, and Citizenship will not only be the most comprehensive work in print on the subject, it will bethe first to offer a empirically rigorous critique of the most popular form of living in America today.
     
Columbia rising : civil life on the upper Hudson from the Revolution to the age of Jackson
John L. Brooke.
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.
The story of Martin Van Buren-kingpin of New York's Jacksonian "Regency," president of the United States, and first theoretician of American party politics-threads the narrative, since his views profoundly influenced American understandings of consent and civil society and led to the birth of the American party system. Brooke masterfully imbues local history with national significance, and his analysis of the revolutionary settlement as a dynamic and unstable compromise over the balance of power offers an ideal window on a local struggle that mirrored the nationwide effort to define American citizenship. InColumbia Rising, Bancroft Prize-winning historian John L. Brooke explores the significant struggle within the young American nation over the extension of social and political rights after the Revolution. By closely examining the formation and interplay of political structures and civil institutions in the upper Hudson Valley, Brooke traces the debates over who should fall within and outside of the legally protected category of citizen. The story of Martin Van Buren-kingpin of New York's Jacksonian "Regency," president of the United States, and first theoretician of American party politics-threads the narrative, since his views profoundly influenced American understandings of consent and civil society and led to the birth of the American party system. Brooke masterfully imbues local history with national significance, and his analysis of the revolutionary settlement as a dynamic and unstable compromise over the balance of power offers an ideal window on a local struggle that mirrored the nationwide effort to define American citizenship.
     

The first step to becoming a U.S. citizen is to receive a permanent resident (green) card. Then you can apply for naturalization to become a U.S. citizen. The process will include filling out forms, taking a test, being fingerprinted, being proficient in English, and going through an interview.

Learning American history and civics is a necessary step in the naturalization process. During your citizenship interview, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Officer will first review your U.S. application for naturalization. They may ask for clarifications on your written answers. As well, during this interview they will ask you, either written or oral, questions on American history.

When you have passed your citizenship interview and test, you will still need to officially swear the Oath of Allegiance in front of a judge.

More than half of the nation's legal immigrants are now naturalized citizens, "the highest level in a quarter century and a 15 percent increase since 1990".

(from the Pew Hispanic Center)

New citizens go through the naturalization process for many reasons. Some do it because the United States is the country of their children--a country where they can now vote and serve on jury duty. Still others see it opening opportunities for travel, jobs, and scholarships. Whatever the reason, the new citizens proudly raise their right hand and repeat the Oath of Allegiance, "I hereby declare on oath...".

 

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Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff