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Professional organizers to the rescue
Toss, keep, sell! : the suddenly frugal guide to cleaning out the clutter and cashing in
Leah Ingram.
Avon, Mass. : Adams Media, c2011.
The American house is one cluttered place. Frugal folks need to get their homes in orderandfind ways to make money from the junk they no longer need or want. That's where this book comes in!

Organized by rooms of the house and tasks of the day, this book becomes a veritable clutter checklist. Each chapter in this reader-friendly guide features:

  • Cashing In: A profile of everyday people who have earned big while clearing out
  • Quick Clutter Challenge: Easy ways for you to declutter a space in thirty minutes or less
  • A Keep, Toss, Sell Chart: A visual organizer to help get every room of the house under control
  • Cash Back in This Chapter: What better way to motivate you than to point out potential earnings from one chapter's worth of tips?

You can forget paying big bucks for a professional organizer. With Leah Ingram as your guide, you'll have extra money--and a home you can be proud of--in no time!

     
Live more, want less : 52 ways to find order in your life
Mary Carlomagno.
North Adams, MA : Storey Pub., c2010.
Strip away the chaos and clutter, freeing space in your life for order and serenity. Mary Carlomagno's 52 WAYS-each featuring a theme for the week and daily practice suggestions-are organizational and inspirational gems, designed to set you on the path toward a more fulfilling life. Less stuff; more time to enjoy the things you love. Book jacket.
     
200 tips for de-cluttering : room by room, including outdoor spaces and eco tips
Daniela Santos Quartino.
Richmond Hill, Ont. : Firefly Books, 2010.
Practical storage solutions for reducing annoying clutter throughout the home.Household clutter is often caused by a lack of storage or the poor use of existing storage. Room-by-room, 200 Tips for De-cluttering addresses many typical storage problems -- from clothing in the bedroom to gadgets in the kitchen to toys in the living room to newspapers, magazines and remote controls in the family room. For each challenge, the author offers useful solutions that are easy to put into action right away.Color photographs show the beautiful and orderly results of de-cluttering, and helpful captions describe the design features and storage solutions that hide the messiness of life and help keep everything neat and tidy. The projects range from a "kitchen garage" to store small appliances to moveable walls that increase a room's versatility.200 Tips for De-cluttering addresses these problems and many others in an organized way, tackling one area at a time. It covers: Storage inside the house -- kitchens, bathrooms, bedrooms, living rooms, hallways, awkward corners, garages, gyms, home theaters, playrooms, billiards rooms, music rooms and small spaces, including studio apartments Storage outside the house -- pool areas, porches, patios, balconies, roof gardens, outdoor dining areas, sheds, play areas, parking "Green" tips -- eco-friendly de-cluttering, using green materials and establishing ecologically sound household routinesA directory of resources provides a comprehensive list of retailers and services that specialize in the de-cluttering process.200 Tips for De-cluttering is an easy-to-use, practical guide that helps the home owner or apartment renter streamline their space for easier mess-free living.
     
Home organizing & closet makeovers
by Bridget Biscotti Bradley and the editors of Sunset.
New York, NY : Time Home Entertainment, c2010.

Designing a home where everything has its place and every closet makes
life easier for you.

  • Take a room-by-room tour of the home and find great organizing and storagesolutions at every turn
  • Discover practical, time-saving ideas that get you out the door without last-minute searching for the things you need
  • Learn basic organizing principles, such as regularly thinning out your possessions and grouping similar items
  • Guidance from experts on how to create attractive displays of your collections
  • Tips on saving time and money when working with decorators and professional organizers
     

All over America closets and storage sheds and garages overflow with stuff.  Americans have packed their homes to the ceiling with their possessions. Too many people are unhappy with the state of their homes. Their clutter makes them uneasy or even depressed. Professional organizers can help by restoring order from chaos.

It is common for people to become paralyzed when dealing with all of the things they own. The task of organizing it all seems enormous so they don’t even start! Meanwhile, they continue to purchase more stuff and bring it home.

Areas that need clutter control 

Garages: These are the dumping ground for expensive tools, lawn and automotive equipment, and items of value seldom used

Kitchens:  Too many small appliances and multiple cooking utensils jam today’s kitchens

Basements: Collections of things saved for that “someday” use that never comes

Home Offices: Paper and electronic equipment create 21st century clutter

Does this sound like an entertaining challenge? Have you ever offered to help a friend organize her closet for fun?  If you have good organizational skills and are good with people, consider starting up an organizing service. Successful pros in this field are good at visualizing space and how items fit. They are creative and can think of several solutions to one problem. They like helping people and they project a calm, professional manner that inspires confidence.  They are diplomatic. Most of all, they look forward to cleaning up a mess, taking joy in bringing change to a client’s home and lifestyle.

Americans are acquiring bigger homes, buying more stuff, and looking for ways to live peacefully with their consuming habit. Professional organizers can bring order and calm to messy households. This home-based business is growing in popularity. Check it out today!

Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff