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Hawkeye state - Iowa

"Is this Heaven? No, it's Iowa." A place of fertile soil, traditional values and simple pleasures.

The quote is from the Universal Pictures film The Field of Dreams. The baseball diamond was built on two farms. When production was over the Lansing family kept the baseball field intact, and added a small souvenir hut. The owner of left and center field returned his land to farming, but then restored the baseball field and opened up his own souvenir hut.

Midwest hauntings
Lee Prosser.
Atglen, PA : Schiffer Pub. , c2010.
Experience ghosts, hauntings, paranormal and supernatural occurrences, and the ongoing presence of UFOs! See the spirits of Frank Sinatra and John Dillinger in Chicago, the ghost of Ernest Hemingway fishing on Walloon Lake, and the ghosts of Anoka State Hospital. Watch the ghosts of Elizabeth Polly at Sentinel Hill, Catherine Sutter in search of her children, and the ghost haven at Eldridge Hotel. These and other paranormal occurrences await you.
     
The 1,000-year flood : destruction, loss, rescue, and redemption along the Mississippi River
Stephen J. Lyons.
Guilford, Conn. : Globe Pequot, c2010.
Every year, flooding wreaks havoc across much of the Midwest. But the floods of 2008 were on a scale unlike anything seen in generations. From Minnesota to Missouri, Illinois to Iowa, the thousand year floods of 2008 - as some climatologists called them - caused tens of billions of dollars of damage. The human stories associated with this epic event that affected the Mississippi River and its tributaries are riveting. The 1,000-Year Flood is a powerful tale of heroism, of heart-wrenching loss, and of hope. Looking at the epic events of the summer of 2008 - and, in particular, at the devastated city of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and its will to rebuild - Stephen Lyons weaves a compelling and inspiring narrative set against the backdrop of a millennium of natural disasters in the region. He asks: What does the flooding mean for residents who face it year after year? Are the affected areas ignored because they're fly-over states?
     
Notes from no man's land : American essays
Eula Biss.
Minneapolis, Minn. : Graywolf Press, c2009.
Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism Winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize A frank and fascinating exploration of race and racial identity In a book that begins with a series of lynchings and ends with a series of apologies, Eula Biss explores race in America.  Her response to the topic is informed by the experiences chronicled in these essays -- teaching in a Harlem school on the morning of 9/11, reporting for an African American newspaper in San Diego, watching the aftermath of Katrina from a college town in Iowa, and settling in Chicago’s most diverse neighborhood.  As Biss moves across the country from New York to California to the Midwest, her essays move across time from biblical Babylon to the freedman’s schools of Reconstruction to a Jim Crow mining town to post-war white flight.  She brings an eclectic education to the page, drawing variously on the Eagles, Laura Ingalls Wilder, James Baldwin, Alexander Graham Bell, Joan Didion, religious pamphlets, and reality television shows. These spare, sometimes lyric essays explore the legacy of race in America, artfully revealing in intimate detail how families, schools, and neighborhoods participate in preserving racial privilege.  Faced with a disturbing past and an unsettling present, Biss still remains hopeful about the possibilities of American diversity, “not the sun-shininess of it, or the quota-making politics of it, but the real complexity of it.” Eula Bissis the author ofThe Balloonists. She teaches nonfiction writing at Northwestern University and is co-editor of Essay Press. Her essays have appeared inHarper's Magazine andThe Believer. She lives in Chicago. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award ASchool Library JournalBest Adult Book for High School Students Winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize   In a book that begins with a series of lynchings and ends with a series of apologies, Eula Biss explores race in America. Her response to the topic is informed by the experiences chronicled in these essays—teaching in a Harlem school on the morning of 9/11, reporting for an African American newspaper in San Diego, watching the aftermath of Katrina from a college town in Iowa, and settling in Chicago's most diverse neighborhood.   As Biss moves across the country—from New York to California to the Midwest—she brings an eclectic education to the page, drawing variously on the Eagles, Laura Ingalls Wilder, James Baldwin, Alexander Graham Bell, Joan Didion, religious pamphlets, and reality television shows. These spare, sometimes lyric essays explore the legacy of race in America, artfully revealing in intimate detail how families, schools, and neighborhoods participate in preserving racial privilege. "I fought with this book. I shouted, 'Amen!' I cursed at it for being so wildly wrong and right. It's so smart, combative, surprising, and sometimes shocking that it kept me twisting and turning in my seat like I was on some kind of socio-political roller coaster ride. Eula Biss writes with equal parts beauty and terror. I love it."—Sherman Alexie "I fought with this book. I shouted, 'Amen!' I cursed at it for being so wildly wrong and right. It's so smart, combative, surprising, and sometimes shocking that it kept me twisting and turning in my seat like I was on some kind of socio-political roller coaster ride. Eula Biss writes with equal parts beauty and terror. I love it."—Sherman Alexie   "'Gangs are real, but they are also conceptual,' Eula Biss says, and the wide embrace of that observation speaks well for her e
     
Oneota flow : the Upper Iowa River and its people
by David S. Faldet ; foreword by Wayne Franklin.
Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, c2009.
Whether profiling the chief of the last hunter-gatherers on the river, an early settler witnessing her first prairie fire and a modern wildlife biologist using fire to manage prairies, the manager of the Granger Farmerrsquo;s Co-op Creamery, or a landowner whose bottomlands are continually eaten away by floods, Faldet steadily develops the central idea that people are walking tributaries of the river basin in which they make their homes. Faldet moves through the history of life along the now-polluted Upper Iowa, always focusing on the ways people depend on the river, the environment, and the resources of the region. He blends contemporary conversations, readings from the historical record, environmental research, and personal experience to show us that the health of the river is best guaranteed by maintaining the biological communities that nurture it. In return, taking care of the Upper Iowa is the best way to take care of our future.
     

The two owners continue to maintain separate tourist facilities. So bring your favorite bat, ball and glove and play a little catch, run the bases or sit on the bleachers and watch the Ghost Players play a game.

Experience a simpler way of life at the Amana Colonies. Founded by a group of German-speaking European settlers who belonged to a religious group known as the Community of True Inspiration. Here they began a communal system of living and divided into seven different villages.

Relive some traditions such as family style dining in some of the original communal kitchens serving up old-world delicacies such as smoked meats, sausages and cheeses.  Watch over the workbench of skilled cabinet makers as they handcraft furniture. Be sure to stop for an Amana cocktail - mixing grape wine with a dry rhubarb wine in the wine glass.

Hawkeye nickname


The nickname for Iowa is said to have come from the scout, Hawkeye, in The Last of the Mohicans, published in 1826. It was given approval by territorial officials twelve years after the book was published and eight years before Iowa became a state.

Amana Refrigeration, is a product from the Amana Colonies. Founder George C. Foerstner lived his entire life in the Amanas.

Do not confuse Amana with Amish. The Amana people live in these seven villages and nowhere else.

Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff