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Windy City - Chicago
Are we almost there? Chicago : what to do and where to go with the kids
[text, Lori Meek Schuldt ; edited by Amy Lyons].
Guilford, CT : Globe Pequot Press, c2009.
Statement of responsibility from p. [64].
     
Never a city so real : a walk in Chicago
Alex Kotlowitz.
New York : Crown Journeys, c2004.
"Chicago, like America, is a kind of refuge for outsiders. It's probably why Alex Kotlowitz found comfort there. He's drawn to people on the outside who are trying to clean up - or at least make sense of - the mess on the inside. Perspective doesn't come easy if you're standing in the center. As with There Are No Children Here, Never a City So Real is not so much a tour of a place as a chronicle of its soul, its lifeblood. It is a tour of the people of Chicago, who have been the author's guides into this city's - and in a broader sense, this country's - heart."--BOOK JACKET.
     
The pig and the skyscraper : Chicago : a history of our future
Marco d'Eramo ; translated by Graeme Thomson ; foreword by Mike Davis.
London ; New York : Verso, 2002.
Lying on the shores of the boundless sea that is Lake Michigan, Chicago is the most American of American cities, offering what neither New York, San Francisco nor Los Angeles can provide: a reality check, an idea of what the heart of America is really thinking. Like a cross between Philip Marlowe and Walter Benjamin, Marco d'Eramo stalks the city streets, leaving no myth unturned. Unpacking his "old world" conceptual baggage and maintaining a European's detached, incredulous gaze, he slowly comes to recognize the familiar stink of modernity that blows across the Windy City, the origins of whose greatness (the slaughterhouses, the railroads, the lumber and cereal-crop trades) are by now ancient history, and where what rears its head today is already scheduled for tomorrow's chopping block. Chicago has been the stage for some of modernity's key episodes: the birth of the skyscraper, the rise of urban sociology, the world's first atomic reactor, the economic school of the Chicago Boys. Here in this postmodern Babel, where the features and contradictions of American society are writ large and deep, we witness the revolutionary, subversive power of capitalism at its purest. Book jacket.
     
Literary Chicago : a book lover's tour of the Windy City
Greg Holden.
Chicago : Lake Clarenmont Press, 2001.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-309) and index.
     

Chicago nicknames

Windy City
Second City
Chitown
City That Works
City of Neighborhoods
City by the Lake

More Chicago nicknames

Chicago, located on the shores of Lake Michigan, offers a diverse collection of museums, inviting lakefront parks, and is home to world championship sports teams.

These are some of the top Chicago attractions that no visitor should miss.

  • Art Institute of Chicago - Learn how people from all over the world have created art objects that reflect their ideas, dreams, fantasies and experiences as you explore galleries filled with one of the world's finest collections of art.
  • John G. Shedd Aquarium - The world's largest indoor aquarium is home to almost 8,000 aquatic animals including fish, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, birds and mammals from waters around the world.
  • Navy Pier - Navy Pier sits right on Lake Michigan. It offers recreational and entertainment activities with gardens, amusement rides, restaurants and more. The ferris wheel is the Pier's most noticeable attraction.
  • Wrigley Field - Was named Wrigley Field in Willam Wrigley, Jr's. honor in 1926. The seats here are almost all close to the field, beautiful ivy vines on the outfield wall were planted in 1937 and the scoreboard is still manually operated.
  • Field Museum - Within one museum, visitors can travel the globe to discover some of the most interesting cultures, environments, and animals of our ever-changing planet. The Museum has exciting exhibitions drawn from over 20 million artifacts and specimens.
  • Willis Tower - Held the title of world's tallest building for 22 years, at 1,454 feet. The observatory elevators are among the world's fastest going 1600 feet per minute. There is even a double-decker express elevator taking passengers from the first two floors to floors 33/34 and 66/67.

Chicago offers a range of attractions that keeps visitors coming back again and again.

Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff