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Beautiful Costa Rica
Midnight rainbow
Linda Howard.
Sutton : Severn House, 2009.
A romance in the jungle - Grant Sullivan, tough, masculine and handsome, is a retired military expert entrusted with a mission in the Costa Rican jungle - to find hostage and socialite Jane Hamilton Greer. When Grant rescues her in a rather cavalier and physical fashion, no love is lost between them. But gradually their mutual attraction and passion becomes apparent and the jungle smoulders in more ways than one.
     
A field guide to plants of Costa Rica
Margaret B. Gargiullo ; with photographs by Barbara L. Magnuson & Larry D. Kimball.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts one of thewidest varieties of plants in the wold, with habitats ranging from tidalmangrove swamps, and lowland rainforests, to dry tropical evergreen anddeciduous forests. Field Guide to Plants of Costa Rica is a must-have reference guide for beginnerand expert naturalists alike. It provides a thorough survey of more than 850plant species, each entry accompanied by color photos and a concise yet detailednarrative description. Plants are conveniently grouped by the different types ofvegetation: palms, tall trees, shrubs, woody vines, herbaceous vines, herbs,grasses and ferns. Along with 1400 color photographs, the guide also includes anillustrated glossary of plant parts, five maps of Costa Rica, and laminatedcovers for durability in the field. With so much readily accessible information,this book is essential for exploring Costa Rica's common and conspicuous florafrom the plants growing along the roadside to the best natural parks.
     
Wild Costa Rica : the wildlife & landscapes of Costa Rica
Adrian Hepworth.
Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, c2008.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 172) and index.
     
Wishbones
Carolyn Haines.
New York : St. Martin's Minotaur, 2008.
     
100 butterflies and moths : portraits from the tropical forests of Costa Rica
Jeffrey C. Miller, Daniel H. Janzen, Winifred Hallwachs.
Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2007.
understanding of Costa Rica's Lepidoptera and has brought about advances in restoration ecology of tropical habitats, biodiversity prospecting, biotechnology, and ecotourism development.
     

Costa Rica is a small but spectacular country in Central America. About half the size of Virginia, it fits between Nicaragua and Panama, and has coastlines on both the Pacific and the Caribbean.

Nobel Prize Winner

In 1987 Oscar Arias Sanchez, then president of Costa Rica, won the Nobel Peace Prize, honored for his peace-making efforts in Central America.

(more about President Sanchez)

Costa Rican side trips

Volcano visit: Climb, photograph, or eat while you watch lava stream by you.

Canopy tours: See the rain forest where the action is--at tree-top level.

Many things set Costa Rica apart from its neighbors.  It became a democratic republic in 1848 and (except for a 12-year 19th century dictatorship) has remained democratic and relatively stable ever since. It has no standing army; it has a literacy rate approaching that of the United States.

Costa Rica is blessed with an astonishing sampling of biological and ecological diversity. Without spending a lot of travel time within the country, a tourist can experience

  • the lush growth of mountain rain forest
  • the mangrove tangles of the Caribbean coast
  • the urban pleasures of San José, the capital
  • the warm, white sand beaches of the Pacific coast
  • the scorched-earth sterility of active volcanoes.

With a rare recognition of its natural treasures, Costa Rica has set aside better than a quarter of its land area as national parks and ecological buffer zones. The country has become a mecca for eco-tourism, from slow-paced bird-watching to white water rafting. Tourism has become Costa Rica's primary producer of income.

Costa Rica appeals not just to the active traveler, but to the retiree. The government actively recruits those whose working years are behind them. Retirees find they can live comfortably--even luxuriously--for far less than they would spend in the U.S.

Traveler or retiree--both find lots to like about Costa Rica.

Article by: St. Louis Public Library staff